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Campaign launch

The new phase of #visafree information campaign was launched today, 10 October...

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Visa liberalization means free movement to the Schengen countries. With visa liberalization you will be  able to stay visa-free up to 90 days (in any 180 day period) in the Schengen area.

However, you are not automatically entitled to enter the Schengen area.
For a visa-free entry you need a biometric passport (valid for at least 3 months after the date you intend to leave the EU country you are visiting). Border officials in EU countries may ask for supporting documents that justify the purpose and conditions of the intended stay (e.g. proof of lodging, return or round-trip ticket) and evidence of sufficient financial means. The Border Police may deny your entry if you do not meet the entry conditions or the conditions for visa-free travel.

You must not exceed 90 days of stay (within any period of 180 days) in Schengen Area. Misuse and overstay may be fined and result in being expelled and banned from entry into the Schengen area for up to 5 years.

To study or work in one country of the Schengen area, you need a student or working visa issued by the authorities of the respective country.

Schengen area countries:
Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece,Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, and Switzerland. Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, and Romania will also apply the visa-free regime.

Visa liberalization means free movement to the Schengen countries. With visa liberalization you will be  able to stay visa-free up to 90 days (in any 180 day period) in the Schengen area. However, with visa liberalization you are not automatically entitled to enter the Schengen area.

To travel to Schengen area you need:

  1. Biometric passport
  2. Documents that justify the purpose and conditions of the intended stay (bank statement, tickets, accommodation etc)
  3. Health/travel insurance
  4. Car insurance (if you travel by car)
  5. Proof you have sufficient funds to support yourself during the stay
  6. To not be part of the list of people that are a threat to public order and health
  7. To not be part of the list of people who have banned entry.
  8. If you declare that you are traveling for tourism and no resident will host you, you need a hotel reservation and travel tickets.
  9. If you declare that you are traveling for any activity, you need to submit the invitation or any documents as a proof of the activity.
  10. If you declare that you are traveling for health reasons, you need to submit the confirmation or recommendation for the health institute you plan to visit.
  11. If you declare you are traveling for a visit to a relative, you need to submit the sealed invitation from the host municipality and provide detail information on the person you will visit.

Visa Liberalisation gives you the right to travel without a visa to EU countries. However, if you are are a student and plan to study in any EU countries, you need to get a student Schengen visa.

To get a student visa you need:

  • Letter of acceptance from the University of the Schengen state you want to study in.
  • Completed electronic Schengen student visa form
  • A valid passport
  • 2 current passport sized photos
  • Bank receipt to prove you have paid the processing fee
  • Documentation to prove how you will support your stay in Europe (cash, bank statement, credit cards, etc.)
  • Proof regarding accommodation (Students that prove they have sufficient funds to support themselves during stay, are not required to give this proof)
  • Travel Itinerary
  • Medical/travel insurance valid for your entire stay in the Schengen country.

    Other documents could be requested from the country of the Schengen zone where you want to study.

All of the following documents must be submitted personally at the consulate/embassy of the country you are planning to study in.

Disclaimer: Check with the respective embassy before you submit your visa application, as some countries might require additional documents and information.

Visa liberalization does not mean you can work and live in EU countries. If you want to work there, you should apply for Working Visa at the respective country’s embassy.

To get a working visa you need:

  • The employment contract between the applicant and the future employer residing in any Schengen countries.
  • Electronic application forms for a Working Visa to be filled out.
  • Recent passport-like photo to be attached
  • The passport as well as all the copies of your previous visas, valid for at least 3 months prior to your departure is required. The passport must have at least two blank pages.
  • The copy of the flight reservation for the time intended to travel and the return ticket.
  • Travel/medical insurance valid for any medical emergency covering expenses up to 30,000 EUR
  • Proof of accommodation

All of the following documents must be submitted personally at the consulate/embassy of the country you are planning to work in.

Disclaimer: Check with the respective embassy before you submit your visa application, as some countries might require additional documents and information.

The Schengen Agreement signed on June 14, 1995, is a treaty that led most of the European countries towards abolishment of their national borders, to build a Europe without borders known as “Schengen Area”.

Signed in Luxemburg, initially by only five EU countries, the agreement remains one of the world’s biggest areas that have ended border control between member countries.

A Schengen visa obtained by any of the Schengen Area member countries allows free movement to its holder within the whole Schengen Zone, except in Spain.

With a schengen visa you can travel up to 90 days in a 180 days period. Staying longer than that, will result in penalties.
The list of 26 countries that are currently members of the Schengen Area: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.

 

Attention! Although most of the Schengen countries are in the European Union, you should not confuse the Schengen Area with the EU.

Visa liberalization, gives Kosovo’s citizens the right to travel visa-free to Schengen countries. The visa liberalization gives citizens the right to stay up to 90 days in a 180 days period. Violating the right has consequence for the individual and all Kosovo’s citizen.
If you stay longer than 90 days in any Schengen country you may:

Be deported to Kosovo
Official note of violation of Schengen visa in your file
You will get a fine (up to 3000 euro)
You will be banned to travel to Schengen area countries for 3 to 5 years

A noticeable number of visa-free travel right abuses may cause the suspend of visa liberalization for Kosovo by EU.